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Centralizing elements with CSS

Authors

en | ptBR

Vertically centralizing

We can do it using left-margin and right-margin.

Example:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8" />
<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" />
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" />
<title>Example</title>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="./css/style.css" />
</head>
<body>
<p class="example">
Lorem ipsum dolor, sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit. Eveniet dolorem architecto in optio
natus quae iste quos inventore soluta eligendi reiciendis unde, esse laboriosam ducimus minima
cumque veritatis. Illum, earum.
</p>
</body>
</html>
body {
text-align: center;
}
p {
width: 300px;
padding: 50px;
border: 20px solid rgb(31, 31, 145);
}
p.example {
margin: 10px auto 10px auto;
text-align: left;
}
margin-center

Set margins to left and right like 'auto' will make the browser put an equal space on two sides. If you don't see yet margin: 10px auto 10px auto, this code work like -> top, right, bottom, left

Horizontally centralizing

We need first to understand an important concept of CSS: the value absolute.

When the position receives the value absolute, the box is removed from the normal flow and does not affect another element's position. Is like the element does not exist.

The displacement properties: top, bottom, left e right specify where the element should appear about the container element. In other words, its relative parent element will be the basis for it to be absolute. Example:

h1 {
position: absolute;
top: 0px;
left: 500px;
width: 250px;
}

Here, the title has been positioned at the top of the page and 500 pixels from its left edge. The width is defined as 250 pixels. And you could change top to any other value and be navigating the page with the element

With that in mind, to fully center an element on the screen, it's possible with position: absolute.

Example:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8" />
<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" />
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" />
<title>Example</title>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="./css/style.css" />
</head>
<body>
<p class="example">
Lorem ipsum dolor, sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit. Eveniet dolorem architecto in optio
natus quae iste quos inventore soluta eligendi reiciendis unde, esse laboriosam ducimus minima
cumque veritatis. Illum, earum.
</p>
</body>
</html>
body {
text-align: center;
}
p {
width: 300px;
padding: 50px;
border: 20px solid rgb(31, 31, 145);
}
p.example {
height: 120px;
position: absolute;
margin: auto;
text-align: left;
right: 0;
left: 0;
top: 0;
bottom: 0;
}
absolute

Without the margin, this would not be possible. He was responsible for leaving all the margins on automatic and the element did the calculation for him to leave in the middle. Another thing is that this only applies if the element has height and width. It was defined in p.

Using flex

As flex is a little more complex concept about CSS, I intend to explain it in a separate post dedicated to that. However, it is simpler to center something using flex.

Example:

<body>
<div class="example">
<p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit. Accusantium, aliquam?</p>
</div>
</body>
* {
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
}
.example {
height: 100vh;
display: flex;
justify-content: center;
align-items: center;
}
flex

References: